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Water Safety

If you are learning how to swim you must know all the risks related to it and therefore learn all the policies, rules and procedures to mitigate those risks. With toddlers one has to be cautious around pools, hot tubs, bathtubs and even standing water in homes.

 

While swimming, Splashing, wading, and paddling mean great fun for children; however, it can sometimes be deadly. Anyone can have a water-related accident — even children who know how to swim can drown, or anywhere — at someone’s home or even at your own house, and that’s why you need to know how to be safe around water. To keep our little ones safe around water, we need to provide the layers of protection by enabling them with the necessary skills like floating and rolling back, mostly when unassisted.

Drowning Prevention

Anyone can have a water-related accident — even children who know how to swim can drown, or anywhere — at someone’s home or even at your own house. So to keep our little ones safe around water, we need to provide the layers of protection by enabling them with the basic required skills like floating, rolling back when unassisted.

 

The drowning deaths continue to remain an invisible public health issue in most of the countries worldwide. The drowning death rate is at least three times higher in developing countries than the developed countries. It has been highly overlooked cause to date.

 

The data by WHO reveals that drowning claims the lives of 372 000 people each year among which the highest rates for drowning are among children under five years of age; Among children ages 1 to 4, most drownings occur in home swimming pools.

 

It also says that more than 90% of drowning occurs in low- and middle-income countries, with the highest rates in the African, South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions.

 

 

Safety Tips

Never Swim Alone

Swimming should only happen when a lifeguard is on duty. Lifeguards don’t just watch the people in the pool, lake or ocean. Their job is also to watch the water and advise swimmers on any safety concerns and questionable conditions that might arise. They are also trained to respond quickly when something happens.

Always Wear a Life Vest

Young children or inexperienced swimmers should always wear a Coast Guard-certified life jacket around water. There are plenty of products on the market claiming to help children stay afloat, such as water wings, floaties, pool noodles, etc., but these are not a substitute for life preservers or lifesaving devices in a genuine emergency. Use these products only when a parent or trustworthy adult is within arm’s length of the child using them.

Supervise Children When They’re in the Water

We understand that parents need to relax too. But when your children are in the water, it’s time to be alert. As a general rule of thumb, a parent should be within arm’s reach of a young child at all times. This rule is true whether they’re swimming in a pool, lake, ocean or bathtub. Parents of older children should stay close and keep eyes on their children at all times. Even ones who are strong swimmers need supervision because they’re prone to trying tricks, flips and dives — all things that can be dangerous in the water.

The best way to remain vigilant when your children are swimming is to put your phone away, and simply enjoy hanging out with each other! If other adults are present, you can take turns watching the pool, so everyone gets an equal chance to relax. Working together to protect your children is the best way to prevent an accident. Children’s hair, bathing suits and even limbs have become stuck in broken or faulty drains, which can lead to drowning or serious injury. Teach children to stay away from these areas in pools, especially if a drain is missing a cover or appears otherwise broken. 

Don’t Play Breath-Holding Games

While swimming, children shouldn’t hold their breath for a long time, as this can cause drowning and has several other severe risks. Make sure children understand competing to see who can hold their breath underwater, and other similar games, can be dangerous and should not be part of any water-related activities. Children who swim competitively should learn proper breathing techniques to avoid problems during practices or meets.

Enter the Water Feet First

Severe injuries can occur when kids jump or dive headfirst into shallow water. Make sure your child understands the proper way to enter and exit the pool. If they’re interested in jumping and diving, make sure to teach them the correct way to do it, as well as point out the areas where it is safe to do so.